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Welcome  to Tullibole Castle                                                                                                                                                    

 There yonder aged castle rears
 Its frame that, once, had princely been,
 And, reckess of the rage of years,
 In state surmounts the Poets Green.

 Here, erst, its hospitable lord,
 Pavilion'd on the grassy ring,
 With dainty viands, plenteous stored, 
 Regaled a court and banqueted a king.



Access Details:


OS Grid Ref: NO 540888 (castle)
OS Grid Ref: NO 0526 0057 (scheduled churchyard)
 
Tullibole Castle is located on the B9097 one mile east of Crook of Devon.

The Scheduled Churchyard and Maze is located on the
Gelvan Road 1/2 mile to the NW of the Castle. KY13 0QN

Access 2010/11 to Scheduled Churchyard: and Maze.
Unrestricted (Free) access at all times from Gelvan Road    

Access 2010/11 to Tullibole Castle
Last week in August - 30 September
from 1.00pm to 4.00pm Tuesday - Sunday.
Admission every half-hour with guided tours only .
Price £3.50  Consesion £2.50
Free admision Doors open Weekend

The late Lord and Lady Moncreiff  

To email the curent Lord and Lady Moncreiff   Click here

Click For Map of the area
The Castle is just to the east of  Drum
Tullibole Castle
From the front

Tullibole Castle is a good example of a laird's house of the early 17th century, built on the 'palace' plan. It is still occupied,
and a wing has lately been added on the N side. The original houseconsisted of an oblong main block lying E-W, the
eastern part having three storeys and the western four, with a wing projecting on the S side. A heraldic panel indicates
that part of it was built by John Halliday in 1608. However, there was probably a much earlier house neer by, there being
in the Record Office in London letters patent to Edward I dated from 'Tullibothville' in 1304. In the same year, a memorandum
states that Edward I had intended to build a castle at Tullibothville,but could find no suitable site. Charter evidence shows
that in 1490, Tulliebole belonged to the  Hering family (there is also recorded in 1482 a bond with the name of
James Hering of Tulliboll), passing to the Hallidays in the 16th century. It passed to the Moncrieffs about 1740.

Tullibole Castle, still in the possession of the Moncrieff family, is generally as described previously. In 1956 considerable
internal restoration was carried out and the exterior harled and whitewashed.



Mrs Bell

Bottom of the Main Stair. The Great Hall

Mrs Bell.                          The Kitchen

things      Dovecote
                                 Things                                                                                             The Dovecote (1715)
 
A book about living in Tullibole in the 1930/40s

By Dr Pamela White (now Dr Pamela Epps)



In 2007 the  external of the castle was restored
Click for the report on the repair work

A ghost story
In ancient times, the Kings of Scotland had frequent occasion to pass from their palace at Stirling, to their palace at Falkland; and sometimes took their route by the way of Tulliebole. One of the King James, tradition does not say which of them, being to pass that way, was askedby the family of Tulliebole to dine.   The invitation was accepted. His Majesty's retinue being numerous, and the castle of Tullibole not being sufficiently commodious for the whole company, a tent was erected on apiece of plain ground, near a small rivulet.  The entertainment was so very agreeable to the King,that he conferred the honour of Knighthood on his host that very day. Amongst the King's attendants, was a troopermuch celebrated for his ability in drinking intoxicating liquors. Among the laird of Tulliebole's vassals,there was one named Keltie, (a name still common in the barony), equally renowned for the same kind of dangerous pre-eminence.  The trooper and he had heard of each other; and each was desirous to try the strength of the other.  They had no opportunity while the King was there;  but they agreed to meet early on a Monday morning, soon after, on the same spot where the King had dined.  It is not said what kind of liquor they made use of; but they drank it from what are here called quaffs, a small wooden vessel,which holds about half an English pint.  They continued to drink, till theWednesday evening, when the trooper fell from his seat, seemingly asleep. Keltie, took another quaff, after the fall of his friend, to show that he was the conqueror;  and this gave rise to a proverb,well known over all the country, Keltie's Mends;  and nothing is more common, at this very day,when one refuses to take his glass, than to be threatened with, Keltie's Mends. Keltie dropped from his seat afterwards, and fell asleep.  But when he awakened, he found his companion dead. He was buried in the same place,and as it is near a small pool of water, it still retains the name of "the Trooper's Dubb."  The anecdote should serve as a warning against the criminal and preposterous folly which occasioned it.  Some of the people are still credulous enough to imagine,that the trooper is still seen sometimes sitting on the spot; and in the night, would rather go a mile out of their way, and pass by the Trooper's Dubb. The road leading by this place, still retains the name of the Court Gate, or Court Way.

Family Tree (Under Construction)
The  Lost Deeds of Tulliebole Castle
Q. Can Moncreiffs visit  Tullebole Castle?
A. Yes. By appointment. But only if Lord Moncreiff is given as muchadvanced notice as possible.
Email



The Hallidays
Tullebole Castle was Last seat of the  Hallidays. 
                                                                                     Hallidays Arms
Family Genealogy Forums
Hallad ayForum
HallidayForum
HolladayForum
Holiday Forum
HollidayForum
                                                   A cutting from the book The Scottish Nation  



 

A Note on the Funeral of Sir John Halliday 1619

Ane Note or Memorandom of Forme of the founerall of Sir John
Healladay of Tilleboll Advocat who dyed at Tilleboll upon the ....
day of .... and was beiried at the Kirk ther, and was caried from
heis Castle there to the said kirk upon Mun-day the 8 March, 1619:
being Convoyed with many Noble Honourable and Worship-full Persones:
All marching upon foote to the said Kirk.
Item Their went before all cled in long dule gounes 39 Poor ones
caryind every on of them on a Stage, and his armes on the one syde
and his name I.S H. on the other syd painted upon black buokrum and
going before all the rest carying on a black Stages end; and the
gumpheon whilk is a morts head painted upon 3 Quarters of black
bukerum, pon[or u]idered (or degented with tears) & those words
Memento Mori.
   Next went John Hing carying the Gumpheon of Honour whichwas3
quartres of tefety with the mort-head one on the same on each syde
with the words Memento Mori.
   Then followed John Oliphant carying the Pinsill whichhis Crest a
Boares-head, argent Couped upon a Pinon or Long Peace of blew tefety
of [two] 2 ells and a « long.
   Next to him followed ......... carying his Armes upon3 Quarters
of blew tefety square-wayes.
   Then followed his 4 Branches.
   Then came Eliazer Makeson and Walter Ritchie Pursevantswithther
Coates Displayed. - Next to them Followed Thomas Drysdaill, Hay
Herald.
   Then followed the Corps in a Coffen caried on foot, byhis
Honourable freinds covered with a very faire mortcloath of black
velvet and 8 pair of his Armes upon the syds of the same, his Eldest
sone was at his head and his freinds accompanying him in Dule &
murning apparall and efter he was bringit furth of his Castel he was
caried from the same just west and then north and at last east to the
kirk whilk was in all also meikle as the bounes of a myle, & a« hour
efter came into the kirk & was sett doune upon 2 stools befor the
pulpete till a Litle prety sermone was made by [the] ordinary
Preacher there And efter the sermoune the said Corps was intered in
the east end of the said Kirk with the sound of a Trumpet And with
God send a joyfull Resurection "
pp. 26 & 27.

Trooper's Dubb Troopers Dubb